Birds Feed and Wild Bird Food UK Supplies

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Peanuts

Peanuts

8 3
Standard Fat Balls

Standard Fat Balls

5 0
Dried Mealworms

Dried Mealworms

4 0
Wild Bird Original

Wild Bird Original

6 0
Berry Suet Pellets

Berry Suet Pellets

3 1
Sunflower Heart Chips

Sunflower Heart Chips

5 1

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About Twootz


Twootz.com is your online provider of quality and low-priced bird feeds, bird seed and wild bird food supplies, as well as a variety of bird feeders. We are based in Leeds, West Yorkshire, and service the entire UK. Also, across most of our product lines we can provide bulk purchase options, ideal for helping a group of friends provide for more birds in multiple gardens.

To complement our range of wild bird foods, Twootz.com is proud to announce that we have now added small animal feeds to our online collection of high quality goods. The available feeds cover parrot, rabbit, guinea pig, hamster, rat, squirrel, ferret, as well as pond and tropical fish food.

Twootz.com likes to support animal and wildlife charities, so if you have anything you wish us to promote via our blog or web pages, please send details to info@twootz.com for consideration.

Blue Tit Feeding On Hand

Wild Birds in the British Isles


There are 574 varieties of British wild birds in the British Isles according to the British Ornithologists Union (BOU) and with a growing population of Human Beings and around 8000 domestic cats, we need to take good care of our feathered friends.

It is very important that if you are feeding wild birds, that you assess your surroundings and the likely dangers that birds could be exposed to. In essence, it is useful to put yourself in the position of a wild bird and consider how you would feel if you were landing on the bird table, feeder or bird bath that has been placed in your garden. Consider if a cat or other animal could attack the bird, based on your positioning of these feeders and/or tables etc. Enjoy the facts and useful tips.

Birds Feeding On Fat Balls

Sudden Burst of Spring by David Cole


Well, everything has experienced the sudden burst of Spring in deepest, darkest West Sussex during the last two weeks. Late, but welcome.

A Sudden Birst Of Spring



My 5am-6am walk to the paddock behind my home to provide a 'comfort break' for an elderly Golden Retriever and her two Springer Spaniel 'nieces' now has me pausing, in spite of the chill, to listen to the Dawn Chorus which seems to get better every day. Every bird from crows to robins has to have their say, and in spite of the apparent discord the sound merges into a real 'Chorus'. I'll be taking a mug of coffee with me from now on and extending my stay.

After more than fifty years as a professional photographer I now get great joy from turning my long lenses on the wildlife in my area - and of course the results supplement my pension - the pictures that I take are used by various media worldwide - and it is something to keep a septuagenarian out of mischief.

I noticed a young rabbit carcass on the Green in front of our house - victim of a stoat judging by the teeth punctures behind the creature's neck. It was attracting the attention of the local Buzzard family - then suddenly a bigger wider version swept in with a well-defined 'notch' in the tail - the first Red Kite to be noted in the locality. So I set up a hide within camera range and spent more than six hours waiting for one of these magnificent birds to take the free offering.

A Sudden Birst Of Spring



The result; nothing more than a profound stiffness and a cold nether region. The carcass was taken overnight...

The bird feeding stations to the south of my home - within a few yards of the kitchen window continue to throng with a variety of Tits, Marsh, Coal, Blue, Great - and this year for the first time the Long Tails have arrived and been tempted in.

The various feeding habits of the Tit family cause much wasted time in my household. Beak shapes, and shyness control some feeding patterns with the Blue Tits now so sure of themselves that a couple of them take seed from my wife's hand.

Nesting is slow with just a couple of sites in a well-developed state - I hope that the forecast cold downturn does not put them off - we could do with some new young life about.

At the end of each day Jessie, (the retriever) with Meg and Emma (the Springer's) take me to the paddock again - it is usually about midnight - and for a few weeks a Robin has been singing. But three days ago there was no mistaking the new voice in the coppice - a Nightingale - and in the distance near the river was another ... this, and my wife assures me that she heard a Cuckoo while sowing some carrots - Spring must be here at last...

Worlds End


The weather over the weekend was glorious, so with that in mind we planned a little bird watching trip over to North Wales to have a look at the booming Black Grouse population at Worlds End.

It was a fabulous day. Worlds End is so easy to get to, only 20 minutes from Wrexham, up the hill and bingo, Black Grouse country.

I remember going up there in the past, 15-20 years ago and seeing low numbers of distant Black Grouse…how times have change, in recent years the species has been doing very well and on Sunday we counted about 70 individuals throughout the morning.

Worlds End



They are superb birds, their bubbling calls echoed across the valleys, it was magical. We came across several ‘Leks’…displaying areas where the males strut their stuff and throw their weight around, they do this to become ‘king Grouse’ and be more attractive to the ladies. One of the Leks we came across was very close to the road and it was marvellous to watch the birds at such close quarters, a real privilege.

We spent a couple of hours watching the Grouse and scanning the area for other species, Red Grouse was present and it was nice to see a Great Grey Shrike…however it was so distant that when viewed through my trusty scope on 60x still it still looked tiny, my friend commented that if it was any further away it would be over the curvature of the Earth!

Worlds End



Black Grouse have become difficult to see over recent years as many of their breeding grounds around the country have slowly dwindled or disappeared altogether, such a shame, it’s fantastic that they are doing so well at Worlds End.

If you fancy taking a look, go between now and late May, get there early as they move away from the lekking areas by 8.00 am or so.

The countryside is lovely, so you can combine a visit with some walking, birding and maybe a picnic. Crossbills and Ravens are regular in the area and look out for raptors…Merlin, Peregrine, Hen Harrier, Buzzard, Red Kite and Short-eared Owl have all been in the vicinity.